Skip navigation

no spam, unsubscribe anytime.
Skip navigation
Goal: 30,000 Progress: 6,503
Sponsored by: The Rainforest Site

Sign now to show your support for protecting snow leopards from climate change through the international community's participation in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change [UNFCCC].

Snow leopards are among an ever-growing list of species threatened by climate change. These magnificent cats live in 12 countries in Central Asia, ranging from the snow-covered mountains of Mongolia and Russia to the Himalayas of Nepal [1] where they play a critical role in their ecosystems as apex predators. Their short forelimbs, long hind limbs, and thick, meter-long tail helps snow leopards traverse steep mountains and thrive in their chilly, high-altitude habitat [2].

As the planet warms due to climate change, however, snow leopards are under increasing threat. Not only does climate change transform habitats, it also forces people to move into new space, including snow leopard habitat previously undisturbed by humans and their livestock [3]. When this occurs, there is often conflict between humans and the leopards when the leopards prey on the easy targets of domesticated animals. In response, herders kill the cats to protect their flocks.

According to National Geographic, "These cats appear to be in dramatic decline because of such killings, and due to poaching driven by illegal trades in pelts and in body parts used for traditional Chinese medicine. Vanishing habitat and the decline of the cats' large mammal prey are also contributing factors." [4]

Protecting snow leopard habitat is the best way to ensure their habitat is undisturbed by humans and remains ecologically sustainable. To do that, climate change must be slowed. According to Snow Leopards Face New Threat from Climate Change--People, "If climate change isn't slowed, more than a third of snow leopard territory might become unsuitable for the cats, according to the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), which has been helping to conserve them for many years." [5]

Fortunately, there is a multi-faceted approach being undertaken by the WWF to protect snow leopards which includes "ensuring access to a secure prey base; gaining a better understanding of snow leopard biology, particularly regarding genetics and disease; creating conditions for human populations in the snow leopard's range to better adapt to the impacts of climate change; and continuing to focus on reducing current threats, such as poaching, retaliatory killings and habitat degradation" [6].

But this is not enough. To have real, true, sustainable protections for the snow leopard, nothing short of an international effort to protect our planet's climate will suffice. Sign today to show your support for the international community's participation in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change [UNFCCC] on behalf of the 4,500 – 7,500 snow leopards left in the wild [1].

Sign Here






To the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change [UNFCCC]:

I am writing to thank you for the important work you are doing to save our planet from the devastating effects of climate change.

As Earth warms, habitats and ecosystems are being threatened and transformed, threatening native flora and fauna. One such animal under increasing threat is the snow leopard, which is uniquely adapted for life in the snow-covered mountains of Central Asia. Around 4,500 to 7,500 of these magnificent cats remain in the wild, though their population continues to be threatened as their habitat vanishes.

Protecting snow leopard habitat is the best way to ensure their habitat is undisturbed by humans and remains ecologically sustainable. To do that, climate change must be slowed. According to Snow Leopards Face New Threat from Climate Change—People, "If climate change isn’t slowed, more than a third of snow leopard territory might become unsuitable for the cats, according to the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), which has been helping to conserve them for many years."

By working to protect our climate, you are making significant contributions to the long-term sustainability of snow leopard populations. On behalf of snow leopards everywhere: thank you for all your hard work.

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


Jul 23, 2018 Brenda Brown
Jul 23, 2018 christine smith
Jul 23, 2018 tanya jansegers
Jul 23, 2018 Litsa Katsarou
Jul 23, 2018 Dafne Davis
Jul 22, 2018 Kelly Dailey
Jul 22, 2018 Laura Calderwood
Jul 22, 2018 Sharon Doggett
Jul 22, 2018 Karen Eskelin
Jul 22, 2018 Karen Samford
Jul 22, 2018 елена лена
Jul 22, 2018 Licia Lopez
Jul 22, 2018 Jennifer Verda
Jul 22, 2018 Regina Reginas
Jul 22, 2018 Constance Keegan
Jul 22, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jul 22, 2018 Jeannie Johnson We have to be their voice
Jul 22, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jul 22, 2018 Cathy Hilbert
Jul 22, 2018 Chuck Hall We must look,and plan and carry out those plans to save our planet and All our animal treasures.
Jul 22, 2018 Shirley Ortiz
Jul 22, 2018 Marilyn Miravalles
Jul 22, 2018 Brenda Stone
Jul 22, 2018 Delana Rupp
Jul 22, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jul 22, 2018 Cathleen Solliday
Jul 22, 2018 Sheila Tran
Jul 22, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jul 22, 2018 Bret Tyrey
Jul 22, 2018 Laura Sims
Jul 22, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jul 22, 2018 Marilyn Harer
Jul 22, 2018 Elizabeth ODonnell
Jul 22, 2018 Barb Benedict
Jul 22, 2018 Kian Daniel
Jul 22, 2018 Corinne Taylor
Jul 22, 2018 Diana Johnson Thi This is urgent
Jul 22, 2018 james field To have real, true, sustainable protections for the snow leopard, nothing short of an international effort to protect our planet's climate will suffice, but also focus on reducing current threats - poaching, retaliatory killings and habitat degradation.
Jul 22, 2018 Anne Carlson
Jul 22, 2018 Vicky Moraiti
Jul 22, 2018 Pauline Köhler
Jul 22, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jul 22, 2018 Chris Hazynski
Jul 22, 2018 Sherri Meagher
Jul 22, 2018 sylvia cheng
Jul 22, 2018 Matilde Ravizza
Jul 22, 2018 Judy Lewandowski
Jul 22, 2018 Katie Mihalko
Jul 22, 2018 T Stevenson
Jul 22, 2018 Susan Faust

back to top

California Casual Shorts
Share this page and help protect habitat: